Quotable Burr

These are the two quotes most often attributed to AB:

“The rule of my life is to make business a pleasure, and pleasure my business.”

“Never do today what you can put off till tomorrow. Delay may give clearer light as to what is best to be done.”

It is also said that he uttered the famous words “Go west young man,” but that’s not true! You’ll also find it’s attributed to Horace Greeley. Also not true. It was written by one John Soule and it first appeared in the Terre Haute Express in 1851. Well after AB’s time.

Published in: on September 5, 2009 at 3:07 am  Leave a Comment  
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On the "Burr Conspiracy"

In June, 1834, as AB was in his last days, his friend and biographer Matthew L. Davis is reported to have questioned him on the alleged plot to seize the American West and establish a new republic under his rule. His answer was swift:

“No, I would as soon have thought of taking possession of the moon, and informing my friends that I intended to divide it among them!”

Published in: on September 4, 2009 at 3:27 am  Leave a Comment  
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As a Father

From Letters to Theodosia, his only surviving child by Theodosia Prevost-Burr

“My property, our home with all of its baubles, mean nothing to me, and whatever honors I have won in this world are empty. You are my only true treasure, and in you is the distillation of all that is pure and noble in your ancestry. Live your life to the full, and beware of giving your heart prematurely, for I will not consent to the gift of your hand to any man who is not worthy of you.”

“You know that you and your concerns are the highest, the dearest interest I have in this world, one in comparison with which all others are insignificant.”

“My letters to others are always ready; but toward you, a desire to say something at the last moment; a reluctance resembling that of parting – but all this you know and feel.”

“What book shall I buy for her? said I to myself. She reads so much and so rapidly that it is not easy to find proper and amusing French books for her; and yet I am so flattered with her progress in that language, that I am resolved that she shall, at all events, be gratified. Indeed, I owe it to her.”

“I really think, my dear Theo., that you will be very soon beyond all verbal criticism, and that my whole attention will be presently directed to the improvement of your style. Your letter of the 9th is remarkably correct in point of spelling.”

“I continue the practice of scoring words for our mutual improvement. The use, as applicable to you, was indicated in a former letter.

I am sure you will be charmed with the Greek language above all others. Adieu.”

“Your little letter from Alexandria assured me of your safety, and for a moment consoled me for your absence. The only solid consolation is the belief that you will be happy, and the certainty that we shall often meet.”